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Rosé Sangria

Rosé Sangria

The following recipe and photography was provided by recipe developer and food photographer, Ashley Durand of Plate & Pen.

It’s finally sangria season!

While sangria can technically be enjoyed at any time of year, nothing beats sipping this cold, wine-based cocktail on the patio on a warm spring or summer evening!

I normally gravitate toward white wine sangrias as I find them to be more crisp and refreshing, but rosé seems to be climbing its way up the list of seasonal wine favorites, so I couldn’t help but make it the star of this drink. Heinen’s has a huge selection, so ask their Wine Consultants for a recommendation. You can’t go wrong with any option on their shelves.

Rosé Sangria

Sangria is not complete without fresh fruit, so I took full advantage of strawberry season and let those swim in the final cocktail along with fresh lemon and raspberries.

The vibrant flavor of the fresh fruit, combined with floral rosé and peach-flavored vodka created the most incredible adult beverage that you’ll want to keep on your at-home happy hour menu this season!

Rosé Sangria

Rosé Sangria

Ingredients

For the Sangria

  • 1 bottle rosé
  • 1 cup peach & orange blossom flavored vodka, Kettle One
  • 1/2 cup raspberry simple syrup (recipe below)
  • 2 cups Heinen's lemon sparkling water
  • 20-25 strawberries, halved
  • 1 cup raspberries
  • 2 lemons, thinly sliced
  • Fresh mint leaves

For the Raspberry Simple Syrup

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • A handful of raspberries

Instructions

  1. Make the simple syrup by bringing the sugar, water and raspberries to a boil in a small pot. Strain the mixture into a lidded jar. Set aside.
  2. In a large 2 liter pitcher, add all of the sangria ingredients in the order in which they are listed above.
  3. Stir and refrigerate for 4-6 hours.
  4. Pour into glasses with ice and serve with more lemon, raspberries and strawberries. Top with mint.

Rosé Sangria

Ashley Durand

By Ashley Durand

The standard chunk of Lorem Ipsum used since the 1500s is reproduced below for those interested. Sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 from "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" by Cicero are also reproduced in their exact original form, accompanied by English versions from the 1914 translation by H. Rackham.

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